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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
by the presidential debate and the whole issue of what happened in benghazi on september 11th, what i call the myth of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened.
by the presidential debate in the whole issue of what happened in benghazi which is the myth of bolivia's irrelevance to u.s. policy. over the course of, if you go back to the foundations of the libyan state in 1951, you know, the u.s. relations with libya have been -- the u.s. has looked at libya as something of an a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece of the strategy that had to do with the region as a whole, but was never really looked at as -- the relationship was never seen as an object in and of itself. you could start off with their relationship with the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine and the united states to siring to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back in, for eight tickets of to get to the list and on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil. the u.s. kind of took, welcome here not as important as egypt, for example. we will think about that. the result was that the prime minister at the time basically devised the plan to court the soviets and see if he can grab the attention. the next major event was libyas
on benghazi. >> you don't think she brought it on herself? >> no. >> mark? >> the bummest rap to my mind was the assumption or the allegations that the supreme court on obamacare was acting out of politics and not out of their understanding of the law. >> clarence? >> yeah. i have susan rice on the top of my list. but i'll add and say nate silver's liberal bias proved to be a mythcal because he was dead on correct in his prediction on his election. >> the bummest rap. the rap recited by bill clinton to a long of democratic convention delegations that the republican party is responsible for the global economic crisis. experts say the cause of the ongoing crisis is trade imbalances creited by then president clinton about 20 years ago when he granted china most favored trading status and when he then negotiated world trade organization membership for china. you got that? >> you're going too fast. i need to take notes, john. >> i will give is to you afterwards, pat. just have the check in the mail. fairest rap? >> lance armstrong is stripped of seven tour de france sometimes. deservedly so f
the attack in benghazi. they are expected to testify in front of two committees. this comes as he is arrested for his alleged role in the attack that killed four americans including u.s. ambassador chris stevens. molly is live in washington with the latest. hi, molly. >> hi, rick. he is a leader in the terror world. he is ambitious and very dangerous and now egyptian authorities aided by u.s. intelligence have him. officials have been tracking him for months according to the "wall street journal" and interest intensified after followers participated in the attack in benghazi, libya. he was captured in the past week or so, but we don't have details yet on how he was detained. u.s.ish ifs have not been able to interrogate him yet. here is what we know. ahmad is a former egyptian jihad member. he was released from a prison in march of 2011. he is the leader of the jamal network and has been setting up terror training camps in libya and egypt with some financial help from al-qaeda and yemen. and he was trying to set up al-qaeda in egypt. meanwhile secretary of state hillary clinton will be testif
. jenna: breaking information in the benghazi terror investigation, as we await news from a bipartisan classified briefing on that deadly attack back on september 11th when terrorists killed four americans, including our ambassador to libya. we are staking out the hearing if case any lawmakers decide to talk. catherine herridge will bring us a live report a little later on in the show. >> reporter: i want to go live to the president who is speaking before a group of business leaders, let's listen in. >> it's good to be back at the business roundtable. jim, thanks for your leadership. originally my team had prepared some remarks, they always get nervous when -- when i'm out there on my own, you never know what i might say. but given the dialogue that we had the last time i thought it was useful for me to abbreviate my remarks, speak off the cuff at the top and spend most of our time just having a conversation. let me begin by saying that all of you in this room are not just business leaders, not just ceo's of your companies, but you're also economic leaders and thought leaders in this c
of the state department has issued a report on the events that took place in benghazi, september 11 of this year. i think it is excellent. there are other committees in congress that have begun other investigations and i think that each of these will contribute to our understanding of what happened in benghazi and help to make sure that nothing like it happens again. under the senate rules, our committee has a special responsibility for oversight. as i said, for the interaction of different agencies of government, it is through that lens that after the tragic events of benghazi on such a member leventhal, the senator and i began our investigation. obviously we were time limited by the end of this year and end of this congress, the end of my service here. i am grateful not only to the senator for once again the extraordinary by partisanship we have had, but also our staffs who have worked together for well. they really work through the holiday when i must ask for my benghazi team to come down to our first floor office. the numbers were smaller than they had been earlier, but they had
tripoli and benghazi, it will be cloudy, the chance of some showers. 19 degrees in cairo as a maximum. along the coast, for the west, whitely dryer -- likely dryer. solutions for america, friday, 7:00 p.m. eastern, 4:00 p.m. pacific. >> hello again. top stories on al jazeera, at least 30 people have been killed in southeastern kenya. the deaths in the delta region have been blamed on fighting between the orma and pokomo tribes. the first round of the draft for the egyptian constitution is planned for friday. u.s. president barack obama says he will work with congress to avert spending cuts and tax hikes in the new year. where republicans budget bill to avert the -- a republican budget bill to avert hit the fiscal cliff was killed in the house. 20 people have been killed in flash floods and landslides in sri lanka. 14 people are missing. tens of thousands of people have been affected. more now from miguel fernandez. >> the worst destruction seen in the center province of sri lanka. behind me, this was washed down by a wall of mud a few days ago. five of the six houses that were suppose
to deny additional security to our ambassador, who is heading to benghazi an even to allow him to be there but there have been multiple attacks in benghazi. the red cross pulled out. the british pulled out. we continue to send our underprotected ambassador there where he and three other brave americans were massacred. jon: is it your view that we should not have had diplomatic personnel on the ground or we should have had a military style protection force or both? >> they either needed to be not there or adequately protected. i want to know why the administration on two occasions following two already previous attacks on the consulate there in benghazi still denied additional security and allowed our ambassador there. these are things that developed before the attacks. so much of this focus has been what happened during and after the attack with susan rice and her comments. i want to get it back to the president and the secretary of state and they bear responsibility for what happened on 9/11. jon: well, secretary clinton has already said that the buck stops with her as far as
on that. martha: lawmakers briefed on benghazi says a video they saw tells them what they need to know about that attack. the fact that it was in no way the result of a spontaneous street protest. what they saw on the video. the impact that could have on this story. .so as you can see, s customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, evertime. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpn pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as.. -[ man ] 1... -[ woman ] 2... [ woman ] 3. [ male announcer ] the bank
is a difficult transition. libya, we obviously know what happened there at benghazi and a country that is unstable. even tunisia isn't doing that well. when you have crisis and chaos there isn't an opportunity for american leadership. what you would need is a president who would have the grand strategy for what do i want to see happen in the world in the next four years and how am i going to get there? >> the strategy seems to be america withdrawal and retreat in the world. we are r going to cut the gash and the defense budget and we are pulling out of afghanistan. we are already out of iraq. we have add do indicated doing anything in syria. the message around the world is that the u.s. is going to be much -- it is going to lead a lot less i than it has. >> we had the right strategy. we could have the right strategy and there isn't an opportunity. >> in the 1920s it game clear that the victorious powers of the united states, france, britain weren't prepared to enforce the global order that they had imposed at thefo versailles settlement. and it became obvious to countries like ge
are seeing with susan rice in benghazi where people live saying, okay, she might have done it, but it is not important so how do we prioritize information to make sure that we are seeing the world correctly or events in the world correctly? it seems like that is an issue that is relevant then and now. >> one piece of good news is that sense september 11th a lot of people have become very, very interested in the middle east, and they never were before. there were forced to become interested in the middle east. not long ago i asked professor lewis was born in 1916, very, very few people in the west when he was. did you ever think that your field would become so important there would be such interest in
talk about that quickly. in libya the militia attacked us in benghazi. you have the unsettled situation in yemen. iran which is building its own weapons system and missile and penetrating iraq. in syria i may say the issue of chemical weapons is the most serious. yes, the regime is moving weapons away from the forces of the rebels but you don't know at what time the regime may use them. you don't know when al qaeda penetrating the rebels may seize some of these rebels. it is a very tense situation in syria. melissa: just so frightening. walid phares. thanks so much for joining us. >> thank you for having me. lori: rising tensions in the middle east, oil under pressure today. fox business contributor phil flynn of price futures group following all the action from the pits of the cme. why is not oil reacting more to the news out of egypt and for that matter syria, too? >> because the market is more concerned about the weakening demand and fiscal cliff and the fact that is up price are getting better. especially in the part of the world you normally look at when you're looking at the middl
watched al qaeda elements able to destroy our or damage severely our consulate in benghazi and kill four brave americans. the message has to be sent that the united states is in engaged and that the united states is ready to be involved and the united states is ready to do whatever is necessary to prevent an act that could endanger or take the lives of literally thousands and thousands of innocent people. >> thanks, john. we have reached a grave moment in the war that's raging in syria now for 20 months. and it's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the si
intelligence capabilities. we sometimes screw that up as the case of benghazi demonstrates the biggest policy question which i hope we debate is how we become more nimble and understand the political trends. thanks. [applause] thank you very much. bret coming you are up. first of all entry honored to be here and particularly honored to be on the panel introduced by jim i have the greatest admiration for and to be with this mostly distinguished panel. [laughter] the exception of course is reuel. the austrian physicist used to put down his worst students by saying you're not even wrong. [laughter] that's why i am inclined to take the comments. you know, if i say to my son what is five plus seven and he says 11, that's wrong. if he says banana then he's not even wrong. what you have heard from reuel especially is a banana. what would he has just essentially done in a very slippery and disingenuous way is to say that the choice that we face is between secular dictatorship in the strike or various others and democracy we have to accept this democracy because even if it is an islamist democracy if
in benghazi. it was involved in attacks and planned attacks in europe. a lot of people forget they tried, actually in the 1990s to fly a plane in the eiffel tower much like what happened in new york on 9/11. so it's a very, virulent group that certainly threatens us and our allies. jenna: your expertise on this, peter, what do you think about our military intervention? we'll explain what that means in a moment. what do you think about us getting involved here? is this a good decision now with the tiling? what your thoughts? >> we need to recognize the threat and we need to prepare to do something but we need to really prepare the terrain. i'm very concerned that we're rushing into something that's very half-baked. the african force that is talked about is a little over 3300 men. which is a laughable amount when you're talking about an area the size of texas. it is not a serious force. so they need our help. they need some training but they're not adequate. so until there's really commitment to put a force in there, that can actually do something, we run the risk of jumping into something
. caller: good morning. i have a question about benghazi. nobody has said anything like this. it seems to me, the president would get on the phone with the president of the other country and say, "please help us save our people." the in the u.s. help support the efforts of the people to get rid of gaddafi? why did obama or hillary clinton get on the phone and call the president of libya and say, "you owe us. san whenever you have to save our people." i believe the local forces went in after it was over and our people were dead. to didn't somebody jawbone, get them in there to help? host: you can talk about any topic you like. joel florida, what is on your mind. caller: you were talking about afghanistan. one of the main reasons we are over there is to keep the poppy plants growing. host: what brings you to that opinion? caller: just research that i do online. host: how do you think things are going to work effort with the troupe drawdown? caller: anybody's guess. host: alright. sharon from california. caller: in 2013, there is a movement coming to washington, d.c., about systemic corru
on september 11 in benghazi. nbc news, cairo. >> venezuelan president hugo chavez is back in cuba for more treatment of cancer that has recurred. he announced he will have more surgery for the illness that returned after two previous operations, chemotherapy and radiation. chavez said if his health were to worsen, his successor would be the vice president, nicolas maduro. and nelson mandela has been admitted to a medical hospital. current president jacob zuma said there was no cause for alarm over the 94-year-old's health, and said mandela is doing well and receiving medical care consistent with his age. mandela spent 27 years in prison during his fight against apartheid and became south africa's first black president in 1994. >> eight people were killed when two small planes crashed in midair in in germany. police spokesperson said weather conditions were ideal at the time of the collision. to brazil where an inmate found himself stuck in a difficult situation. two prisoners were trying to escape the jail. the first inmate made it out but the second got stuck in a hole in the wall. prison
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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